Things to Know Before Brushing Out Your Dreads

brushing out dreads

Though the point of this entire blog is how to get dreads, there are some things you still should know about removing them that are helpful to know in advance of the choice from the start.

People change their minds and as “permanent” as dreads might seem, you always have the choice to remove them and there are plenty of ways to remove them. Brushing out your dreadlocks is one of the best ways to remove them without shaving them off or taking months to grow them out slowly, but you should know a few things before you start brushing out your dreads.

1. You’ll Need Time

Now, time is mostly relative to people, but depending on the length, thickness, and the sheer number of dreads you have on your head it could take anywhere from 5 hours to 2 days of combing out. Be sure you set aside this time and plan to take a few breaks in there. Your hands will get tired and so will your scalp from the constant tugging.

When you start combing out your dreads, try to start in the back and the lower half, that way if you take breaks or a day off, it can be put up into a bun without alarming anyone or looking too crazy to go out into public.

2. You’ll Need Products

There are a few products that you will need by your side from start to finish when you start brushing out your dreads. When you hear the word brushing, you are probably thinking that a regular comb or brush will do and that’s not the case at all.

Instead, you will need a metal-toothed comb and some of them will even have a picking tool on one end. You will start at the lowest part of the dread and slowly untangle and separate small hair by hair. Likewise, to help this process along, you can use some type of oil. There are plenty of oils to choose from so be sure to research a type of oil that fits your hair type; it could be as simple as coconut oil or something more complex like castor oil or argan oil. Using an oil will help repair some parts of your hair and will also help lube up the hair strands for slightly simpler combing.

3. You’ll Need Mental Preparation

If you’ve got the time and the tools, you might think you’re ready to go. Not just yet, friend. You are going to need some mental preparation for a number of things that are going to happen.

First, it will take forever and you might want to stop. Taking breaks is fine, but be sure you are prepared to take this project on the long haul or find a trusted friend to lend a hand. Second, you are going to feel some pain. As aforementioned, your hands, arms, and scalp will ache from the tugging and from being used for hours on end.

Third, you will lose A LOT of hair. The average person loses hair every single day. In the shower, as they brush it, as they take out their braid, everything we do causes us to lose hair. While you had your dreads, those hairs still became loose but could not fall out because they were tied up and twisted into each of your dreads. There will be a lot of hair that will come out of your dread and a lot is completely normal. Don’t get too freaked out.

Finally, you will probably notice that the length of your dreads is not the actual length of your hair. In fact, your hair length could actually be much, much shorter than your dreadlock length. This is normal too, so be prepared to lose more than a few inches in length after the dread is removed and plan to lose a few more after you trim off the dead and damaged ends.

Brushing out your dreads is a big choice and being prepared, both mentally and physically, for the task is the most important part of the process.

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